Hivos International

Renewable Energy

Though the reality of climate change is widely acknowledged in Zimbabwe, the country which is currently facing socio economic challenges has limited resources to implement measures to tackle the challenge.

Wilberforce Namanya is a farmer in Bushenyi District in Western Uganda.  Wilberforce and his family live on a hilly unfertile rocky land. Farming on this piece of land has been difficult for a long time.  The Namanyas had always dreamt of becoming commercial farmers but this was thwarted by the nature of the land on where their household is located. This has since changed with the use of bio-slurry (a semi-liquid mixture from a biogas plant that can be used as fertiliser and pesticide).  Wilberforce constructed his first 6 cubic meters biogas plant in 2010.

James Namara is a retired public servant living in Ntungamo district. James constructed his biogas plant in 2010.  Since that time, he has been using bio-slurry to fertilize his farm.  He developed a lot of interest in the bio-slurry use and production that he has now become a model farmer in his district.

Hivos Director of Operations Sanne Nolst Trenité toured a number of Hivos projects and partners in Indonesia at the end of April until early of May this year. For staff at Hivos Southeast Asia, her visit provided opportunities to meet her and discuss developments important to Hivos with her. Interaction, engagement, inspiration, acceleration and support were recurring themes throughout her visit.

Over the past two years, the government of Kenya has set out on an ambitious plan with regards to electrification of both households and public institutions through grid extension, resulting in astronomical jumps in connectivity of both schools and households.

Rachel Kyte, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General, steps on the podium and smiles into a huge hall filled with hundreds of people suited up for the occasion. She takes up the microphone, and and with that simple gesture opens the three-day sustainable energy conference whose title is projected on a gigantic screen above her: ‘Going further, faster together'. In other words, providing energy access for all.

Mr. Sialim’s face looks radiant when he welcome us to his home in Keputran Village of RT005 RW003 Sukoharjo, Pringsewu, Lampung. Even though he has just returned from his fields, Mr. Sialim showed his hospitality and led us into his residence. He did not even mind when we asked his wife, Mrs. Martini, who was at Al-Qur’an studies in the community mosque, to come home for a while and talk to us.

When Mrs. Martini arrived, her friendliness also was apparent as we started to chat.

Hivos Southern Africa welcomes a recent announcement made by Zimbabwe’s Mashonaland West Minister of State, Faber Chidarikire, that 300000 rural households are set to be solar powered under a $4 million facility aimed at eliminating use of non-renewable energy sources.

The project, which is modelled around a prepaid system, will initially target 24000 households, and involves a collbaoration between a private secro company, government and the local community.

Why civil society’s contribution is crucial in ensuring energy access for all

Looking back on my overwhelming first time attending a Council of the Parties (COP) at COP22 in Marrakech last November, it was filled with so many meetings, side panels, negotiations and networking opportunities that it was easy to overlook the real people affected by lack of access to energy. Acronyms were flying all over the place, COP veterans sped past us newbies to get to the next negotiation session for LTF – that’s long-term climate finance to you and me – and  little huddles of people speaking in a truly foreign language (COP-lingo) were gathered outside every meeting room and ever

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