Hivos International

Renewable Energy

Over the past two years, the government of Kenya has set out on an ambitious plan with regards to electrification of both households and public institutions through grid extension, resulting in astronomical jumps in connectivity of both schools and households.

Rachel Kyte, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General, steps on the podium and smiles into a huge hall filled with hundreds of people suited up for the occasion. She takes up the microphone, and and with that simple gesture opens the three-day sustainable energy conference whose title is projected on a gigantic screen above her: ‘Going further, faster together'. In other words, providing energy access for all.

Mr. Sialim’s face looks radiant when he welcome us to his home in Keputran Village of RT005 RW003 Sukoharjo, Pringsewu, Lampung. Even though he has just returned from his fields, Mr. Sialim showed his hospitality and led us into his residence. He did not even mind when we asked his wife, Mrs. Martini, who was at Al-Qur’an studies in the community mosque, to come home for a while and talk to us.

When Mrs. Martini arrived, her friendliness also was apparent as we started to chat.

Hivos Southern Africa welcomes a recent announcement made by Zimbabwe’s Mashonaland West Minister of State, Faber Chidarikire, that 300000 rural households are set to be solar powered under a $4 million facility aimed at eliminating use of non-renewable energy sources.

The project, which is modelled around a prepaid system, will initially target 24000 households, and involves a collbaoration between a private secro company, government and the local community.

Why civil society’s contribution is crucial in ensuring energy access for all

Looking back on my overwhelming first time attending a Council of the Parties (COP) at COP22 in Marrakech last November, it was filled with so many meetings, side panels, negotiations and networking opportunities that it was easy to overlook the real people affected by lack of access to energy. Acronyms were flying all over the place, COP veterans sped past us newbies to get to the next negotiation session for LTF – that’s long-term climate finance to you and me – and  little huddles of people speaking in a truly foreign language (COP-lingo) were gathered outside every meeting room and ever

You can almost see nothing inside the Manyatta (a home, often temporary of the Maasai/Samburu people). The window and only ventilation is the size of two adult hands. There is fire burning probably to keep the place lit up and warm given it is a rainy day. Even with the choking darkness one cannot fail to notice the hanging soot from the mud ceiling. At night, our host, Grace Malipe uses a kerosene wick. She has four children in school and this is their source of light as they go about their homework.

Zimbabwe's Minister of Energy and Power Development, Samuel Undenge, recently announced at the 48th Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) meeting in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe that the region will add 30 000 MW to the region between 2017 and 2022.

Harnessing Zimbabwe's abundant renewable energy resources is key to helping the country support its development strategies and leapfrog towards low-carbon socio-economic progress.

If Women Stop, Power Stops

When we talk about energy we tend to think about cables, megawatts and engineering. But energy is something simpler and more vital than that. According to the Spanish Language Usage Dictionary compiled by Maria Moliner, energy means "greater or lesser ability of someone or something to perform a task, an effort, or produce an effect."

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